Simon Peter answered, ‘You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”  (Matthew 16:16, NIV).

The title, “Christ,” is perhaps the most popular, familiar, and sacred of all the messianic titles, It is derived from the Greek word, Christos, meaning “the anointed one.” Messiah is the equivalent Hebrew word. To Peter, Jesus was unquestionably the Christ prophesied in Scripture, Jesus, the long-expected Messiah, was anointed prophet, priest, and king. As the genuine Messiah, Christ became the center of all prophecy, the antitype of all priesthood, the author of salvation, and the indisputable king of the universe. As prophet, He represented God the Father before the human race (see John 1:18). As priest, He intercedes on the sinner’s behalf before the Father (see Hebrews 7:25); and as king, He liberates all who accept Him as Savior and Lord.

In the New Testament, the title Christ became the official designation by which Jesus of Nazareth was identified. Like a recurring decimal, this redemptive title appears more than fifty times in the four Gospels and more than 320 times in the rest of the New Testament. The authenticity of the title, Christ, as referring to Jesus of Nazareth, was forcefully expressed by Peter in his address at Pentecost: “Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly that God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ” (Acts 2:36, NKJV). God made Jesus the anointed one. This act of Divine anointing attests His redeeming power, His priesthood, and His supreme kingship.

This inspired commentary sums up the work of Christ, the Messiah, in the human heart: “The works of Christ not only declare Him to be the Messiah, but showed in what manner His kingdom was to be established… It comes through the gentleness of the inspiration of His word, through the inward working of His Spirit, the fellowship of the soul with Him who is its life.”–God’s Amazing Grace, p. 16.

My Prayer Today: Lord, may Your saving grace recapture my life this day. Amen.

Life in Christ

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